Roosevelt Elk

Roosevelt Elk

Roosevelt elk (Cervus canadensis roosevelti) can be found on Vancouver Island. Roosevelt elk are larger with larger and more rugged antlers than other members of the species.

Black-Tailed Deer

Black-Tailed Deer

Black-tailed deer are smaller subspecies of mule deer. Their coat is slightly darker in color. They have a small rump patch and a tail that is mostly brown or black.

Black Bear

Black Bear

Black bears are not always black. Color phase black bears can be cinnamon, brown and blonde. A black bear’s coat is long and shaggy.

Mule Deer

Mule Deer

Mule deer have large ears with distinct black borders and white hair inside. A buck’s antlers have two main beams, each of which forks into two beams.

Alaska Yukon Moose

Alaska Yukon Moose

Moose are herbivores that need to eat up to 20 kg of vegetation a day to fuel their nearly 10,000 calorie diets.

Shiras Moose

Shiras Moose

Shiras is the smallest subspecies of moose and can be found in the south east corner of British Columbia, Canada.

Stone Sheep

Stone Sheep

Stone’s sheep occur throughout northern BC and the Yukon. Where the two ranges meet in southern Yukon and parts of BC, interbreeding has resulted in the fannin sheep, which are classified as Stone’s sheep.

Dall’s Sheep

Dall’s Sheep

Dall’s sheep live in parts of the Yukon, Northwest Territories and the extreme northwestern corner of BC.

California Bighorn Sheep

California Bighorn Sheep

The horns of a California bighorn have more of an outward flare than those of the Rocky Mountain bighorn.

Caribou

Caribou

In Canada there are three subspecies of caribou: peary caribou, woodland caribou and barren ground caribou.

Cougar

Cougar

The cougar mainly preys on deer, but may also prey on bighorn sheep, mountain goats, elk, moose, beaver, porcupine, mice, rabbits and birds. A cougar’s weight will vary from 70 to 109 lbs (32 to 86 kg).

Bison

Bison

The North American bison, mistakenly called “buffalo” by the early settlers, evolved into two subspecies: the wood bison and the plains bison.

White Tailed Deer

White Tailed Deer

Deer are the most abundant big game animal in North America. Mule deer have the widest distribution throughout British Columbia

Canada Moose

Canada Moose

In North America, the Canada moose (Alces alces andersoni) subspecies is exceeded in size only by the Alaska Yukon subspecies.

Bighorn Sheep

Bighorn Sheep

Rocky Mountain Bighorn sheep are more widely distributed throughout the United States than Canada and are noted for their ability to survive incredibly diverse conditions.

Rocky Mountain Elk

Rocky Mountain Elk

Elk have a golden brown coat during the summer and a longer, grayish brown coat during the winter. Their legs, head and neck remain dark brown year round.

Grizzly Bear

Grizzly Bear

Grizzly bears are the second largest land carnivore in North America. They are widely distributed throughout the Yukon and the mainland parts of the Northwest Territories and Nunavut.

Mountain Goat

Mountain Goat

The natural range of the mountain goat includes southern Alaska and Yukon, British Columbia, northern Idaho, northwest Montana and parts of Washington. British Columbia contains more than half of the world’s population of mountain goats.