MOUNTAIN GOAT

Mountain goats have the thickest and longest pelage of any North American ungulate aside from the muskox.

Despite its name a mountain goat (Oreamnos americanus) is actually not a member of the actual goat genus. Mountain goats belong to a group known as goat-antelopes. The natural range of the mountain goat includes southern Alaska and Yukon, British Columbia, northern Idaho, northwest Montana and parts of Washington. British Columbia contains more than half of the world’s population of mountain goats.

Mountain goats have the thickest and longest pelage of any North American ungulate aside from the muskox. Their coats are white and usually fairly shaggy, including hollow guard hairs up to 20 cm long and a fleecy undercoat that is 5 to 8 cm long. Both sexes sport a noticeable beard, which is longer in winter. Mountain goats have a deep chest and well-developed shoulder muscles that give them great strength for climbing and pawing for food in the winter. A mountain goat’s cloven hooves have rough, textured traction pads that project past the rim of the hooves, which makes them conducive to rocky and slippery terrain.

Both sexes have long ears and narrow, black, short, sharply pointed horns. A nanny’s horns are more slender at the base and a bit more curved at the tip than a billy’s horns. A mountain goat’s horns will grow continuously and never be shed. The growth rings or annuli on the horns indicate age. During mating season a male often marks a female with a musky oil from glands at the base of his horns by rubbing his head against her body.

Most mountain goats graze above the tree line and survive by eating a wide variety of plants including lichens, ferns, grasses, herbs, shrub and deciduous or coniferous trees. A mountain goat’s weight will vary from 120 to 265 lbs (55 to 120 kgs), depending on its gender and food supply.

Species to Hunt in BC

ROCKY MOUNTAIN BIGHORN SHEEP

In late summer and autumn, bighorn sheep have a brown coat with a contrasting ivory-white rump patch, a white muzzle and white trim on the

MOUNTAIN GOAT

Mountain goats have the thickest and longest pelage of any North American ungulate aside from the muskox. Despite its name a mountain goat (Oreamnos americanus)

Moose

CANADA MOOSE

Moose are herbivores that need to eat up to 20 kg of vegetation a day to fuel their nearly 10,000 calorie diets. In North America,

Whitetail Deer

WHITE-TAILED DEER

White-tailed deer are tan or reddish-brown in the summer, and grayish-brown in the winter. The white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virignianus) is the most widely distributed of

North American Bison

NORTH AMERICAN BISON

Bison can weigh more than a ton and stand up to 2 meters tall. Bison (Bison bison), also known as buffalo, are very large animals

Cougar or Mountain Lion

COUGAR (MOUNTAIN LION)

The cougar mainly preys on deer, but may also prey on bighorn sheep, mountain goats, elk, moose, beaver, porcupine, mice, rabbits and birds. Cougars (Felis

Caribou in BC

MOUNTAIN CARIBOU

Mountain caribou live in areas where the snow is too deep to dig through and eat the tree lichen of old forest growth for eight

California Bighorn Sheep

CALIFORNIA BIGHORN SHEEP

The horns of a California bighorn have more of an outward flare than those of the Rocky Mountain bighorn. California bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis sierrae)

Dall's Sheep

DALL’S SHEEP

Dall’s sheep live in parts of the Yukon, Northwest Territories and the extreme northwestern corner of BC. Clinging to sheer rock faces or sedately grazing

Stone Sheep

STONE SHEEP

The Stone sheep is somewhat larger and chunkier than the Dall’s sheep, with a larger and relatively wider skull, and heavier, darker-colored horns. A mature

Shiras Moose

SHIRAS MOOSE

This huge animal has very long legs, a large hump on its shoulders, and massive palmate antlers. The Shiras moose (Alces alces shirasi) has the

Mule Deer

MULE DEER

Mule deer are brownish-gray in color, have a white rump patch, and a small white tail with a black tip. Mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) are

Black Bear

BLACK BEAR

Black bears can be distinguished from grizzlies by their facial profiles, shoulders, smaller size and shorter claws. Black bears (Ursus americanus) are the most widely

Roosevelt Elk

ROOSEVELT ELK

Roosevelt elk meat is leaner and higher in protein than both chicken and beef. Of the four subspecies of elk found in North America, two

Black Tailed Deer

BLACK-TAILED DEER

Black-tailed deer occur along the entire coast of British Columbia Black-tailed deer are a smaller subspecies of mule deer. Their coat is slightly darker in

Alaska Yukon Moose

ALASKA YUKON MOOSE

The largest sized antlers are usually produced when bulls are 10 – 12 years old, but bulls can reach trophy size as young as 6

Other Species to Hunt in BC

Wolverine

WOLVERINE

Wolverines are fierce animals. They have strong, sharp teeth and semi-retractable claws that they use for digging, climbing and scaring away predators. The wolverine (Gulo

Gray Wolf

GRAY WOLF

Wolves are voracious carnivores and in some cases, have shown to drastically reduce ungulate populations. The gray wolf (Canis lupus), also known as the timber

Canada Lynx

CANADA LYNX

A lynx’s diet is primarily made up of snowshoe hare, but it will also consume squirrels, grouse and other rodents. The range of Canada lynx

Bobcat

BOBCAT

Bobcats will hunt squirrels, rats, mice, voles, beavers and nesting birds, but they prefer rabbit. The bobcat (Felis rufus) occupies open coniferous and deciduous forests,